My book is on Auckland Libraries top 100 books

“The Sound of Breaking Glass” is fourth, alongside some pretty hefty names in the New Voices category of Auckland Libraries’ top 10 best book lists.
The Top 100 brochure is being printed as a nice glossy tri-fold and will be in Auckland libraries as a takeaway for customers. As of today, there are 93 holds on first copy returned of 7 copies at the libraries:

The sound of breaking glass / Kirsten Warner

mediaName Book | Mākaro Press | 2018
Available at Research Central (Central City Library) (General WARN)
93 holds on first copy returned of 7 copies.
Advertisements

Auckland Libraries podcast

Karen Craig from Auckland Libraries interviewed me on Planet FM, about my debut novel ‘The Sound of Breaking Glass’, she says is, “a tour de force set in Auckland in the 1990s which has made it onto the Auckland Libraries Top 100 of 2018, in the New Voices category.”
The podcast is now available on the Auckland City Libraries website under Books & Beyond.

To be or not to be…. on the list


It’s the list time of year, the top 100s, the ‘best of 2018’. I find myself happily leading the New Zealand Herald NZ fiction of the year. Although not on another leading list!
I know it’s subjective, who likes what book or what music. I hear the music journos discussing their ‘best of’ on the radio and wonder if our album Doors Wide Open is there. Pop music predominates, which sounds like it’s written for a market rather than from the heart however plausible the performers try to sound or what the reviewers say about them. I listened through the Spotify playlist at speed later jumping from track to track and it all sounds the same, even the folk-pop artists.
I read the books lists wondering about the prevalence of certain publishers and why certain authors are there again. There’s a flurry on Twitter.
Lloyd Jones’ book is rightly mentioned as one of the year’s best. I’ve just read an interview which says he is completely derisive of the notion of fame and celebrity culture. Here in New Zealand it’s alive and well and wholly pathetic, he says. Is he talking about television and pop stars, or does he include the literati as well?
Lloyd Jones gets on with writing.  I have to separate myself from it all too – or else it will be up one day and down the next.

Must read!

“This morning I messaged round my friends. Have just read a must-read. ‘The Sound of Breaking Glass’ by Kirsten Warner. Topped NZ Booksellers List on the week of its publication this September. P.S. Not for the faint hearted.”
Read kiwiboomers reviewer Janet Hart here. “Did I enjoy this novel? Enjoy is the wrong word.
“I’m still feeling shattered,” she says. ” And I’m already three days out from finishing the novel.”
Paul and Melita Smith began kiwiboomers nine years ago to give fellow boomers a platform for the views of their generation.

Ladies Litera-tea at my alma mater

I’ve had no desire to return to my secondary school and I never go to reunions.  I love the women I went to school with but I don’t recall those years fondly, as I know many of us did not. But I will be going there on Sunday and I am really looking forward to being part of the famous Ladies Litera-tea, The Women’s Bookshop November eventas one of twelve authors speaking about their new books at the Raye Freedman Arts Centre . This is the home of Epsom Girls Grammar School’s performing arts, and I was a bit of a drama queen. People remember me as an absolute rebel, but I promise to behave myself in the weekend.
It will be thrilling to have time to talk to people about writing and my book.
Also in the lineup is Mary McCallum (second from right, bottom row) , author, poet and publishing dynamo behind Mākaro Press, publisher of “The Sound of Breaking Glass” with her own beautiful book of poetry “The ABC of Happiness”.

LADIES’ LITERA-TEA
An afternoon of women’s words, wit & wisdom served with a lavish afternoon tea. With lamingtons, melting moments, asparagus rolls and more!
SUNDAY 4 NOVEMBER – 1pm to 5.30pm. Raye Freedman Centre, Epsom.
Purchase tickets here.

 

Go see Anna Crichton’s exhibition “Ragpicker at 4 am” soon!

I highly recommend catching Anna Crichton’s exhibition Ragpicker at 4am at The Pah Homestead, in fact I will definitely go back for another look before it closes on November 11. Delightfully it occupies the Master Bedroom Gallery!

Award winning illustrator, cartoonist and ceramicist Anna Crichton is responsible for the amazing cover art of my book The Sound of Breaking Glass showing Milk Bottle Man’s fist and forearm against the super-structure of Auckland Harbour Bridge!

Anna travelled to Varanasi, India, on a three-month artist residency in 2017 and came back with these incredible bead works and wood block carvings commissioned from traditional crafts people to Anna’s designs, which tell the tough and moving stories of the people and the streets, the women in particular. I loved it!
Anna Crichton
Ragpicker at 4am
Abstract Embroidery and Woodblock Carving in Varanasi, India
18 September – 11 November 2018
Master Bedroom Gallery

 

Litcrawl Taster coming up.

It’s exciting to be out and about in Wellington on the night of the November Litcrawl – even more exciting to this year be part of it:
“A crime writer, a poet and a novelist walk into a bar… enjoy a good old fashioned readings session with Jennifer Lane (winner of the 2018 Ngaio Marsh Award), Doireann Ní Ghríofa (Ireland), David Coventry (who will be sharing a sneak preview of his forthcoming book), and Kirsten Warner (author of “The Sound of Breaking Glass”).”
Session 8: Tasters
  – 
*All Crawl events are entry by donation (suggested $5).

Number seven on the New Zealand Fiction list.

I’ve just found out “The Sound of Breaking Glass” is at number 7 on the New Zealand Fiction list this week.  I’m pleased it’s selling well, after topping the bestsellers list, number 1 in its first week. Seven is really a very attractive number! I’m keen for some more Milk Bottle Man action!
It’s a mysterious process, letting a book out into the world and not knowing where it’s travelling and who’s reading it. It seems not quite part of me any more. I observe. And each time someone likes it, I’m reassured.